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November 2, 2011
 

Image Reviews: The Last Of The Greats #2

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Written by: Alex
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The Last Of The Greats #2
Publisher: Image Comics
Writer: Joshua Hale Fialkov
Artist: Brent Peeples
Inks: Matthew Waite
Colors: Mirka Andolfo
Letters: Troy Peteri
Editor: Rod Levin
Design: Tony Fleecs
Production: Phil Smith
Logo: Kody Chamberlain

After reading issue #2, some readers may feel disturbed and disoriented, but delightfully so. Josh Fialkov hasn’t been cured of his rollercoasteritis, and fortunately his readers will still be suffering from whiplash.

One of the most beautiful aspects of this title so far is the false sense of security it casts over its victims. Even more so than before, Earth’s situation is complicated. The Last is helping people? Yes, but for a very, very unreasonable price. Does he have mercy after all? No, he is only feigning interest in compassion to win the hearts of humankind.

The Last is terrifying thus far, because he is so similar to various cult leaders that have plagued the world. The main difference being that he actually has the power to act on his tidings of doom. He very quickly goes from a godlike figure bent on revenge to a perversion of the archetypal Christ figure.

Brent Peeples has illustrated some spectacular panels that complement the story very well. The particular two-page spread in which The Last is overlooking a sea of people is awe inspiring. It does a great job of representing the desperate masses, and the lack of detail on the individual faces has a certain effect. It may just be because it’s very difficult to put in that much detail on such a large scene; I interpreted it differently, however. The Last being drawn clearly, while the crowd below remains blurry, almost makes me think of him as a rock star. He is on the stage of fate, and seeing the multitude below can be dizzying, even for him.

Without spoiling too much, this issue really makes one think about how the world would react to the demands of someone who asks for the respect that God does. One that has the influence of fear and destruction on their side.

I believe it was Captain Kirk who said: “Above all else a ‘god’ needs compassion!”

Alexander Lorenzen
alex@comicattack.net
@A_Lorenzen

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