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April 23, 2011
 

Dark Horse Reviews: B.P.R.D. The Dead Remembered #1

B.P.R.D. The Dead Remembered #1
Publisher: Dark Horse
Writer(s): Mike Mignola & Scott Allie
Artist: Karl Moline

Witchcraft is something that was once punishable by death. Eventually, that extreme punishment was outlawed, but in Massachusetts 1693, people would sometimes “police” themselves. In B.P.R.D. The Dead Remembered #1, we see a woman get startled by a mob that has come to kill her for that specific crime. Flash forward to 1976 and the offices of the B.P.R.D., where we see Hellboy and Professor Bruttenholm discussing their latest case. It involves a friend of theirs that is a priest overseeing the renovation of a home that is supposedly haunted. Hellboy suggests that the Professor bring Liz Sherman along. The Professor seems puzzled that Hellboy has suggested this, to which he retorts that she’s been there for two years and never leaves the house.

As they arrive in Massachusetts, the Professor finds Liz’s medication thrown on the floor. He doesn’t question her about it, but tells her that she is here to relax. As father Yafides invites them inside, Liz is very cold towards him. He then tells her and the Professor a story about a woman who fled Europe to get away from the witch hunting, but ended up a victim anyway in Massachusetts years later (the girl from the beginning part of the book). We then see the Professor perform an exorcism of sorts, and that’s when the real fun begins.

I’ve been wanting to read a B.P.R.D. story for a while now for two reasons. First, Mike Mignola’s work has always caught my eye, but I just never acted on it, and well, I’m pretty much a Marvel zombie. Secondly, the movie Hellboy: Blood and Iron impressed the crap out of me when I saw it a few months ago, so I’ve been dying to get my hands on one of these titles. That movie, which slightly mirrors this story, was nothing short of fantastic, because it took a non-fan like myself and made me think about the franchise or want to watch it, on a weekly basis.

Mignola is a great storyteller and Karl Moline’s artwork is great for this eerie kind of book. You really get a feel for what’s going on just by the bright colors that you see, but there are also darker tones to compliment the spooky feeling that Mignola is trying to put across with the dialog. Do yourself a favor, and pick up this title. It’s only going to be a three issue mini, so take a chance on this great book!

For more from Dark Horse, click here.

Billy Dunleavy
billy@comicattack.net

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